Isabel Menzies-Lyth

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Title: Isabel Menzies-Lyth
Year: 2008
Authors: Fraher, A.
Abstract:

Isabel Menzies-Lyth, who died in 2008, was a seminal thinker in the application of Kleinian ideas to the social and organizational fields. Among her enduring theoretical innovations is the idea of “social defenses,” which provides a lens for understanding the impact of individually experience anxieties on the functioning of organizations. She was also a key member of the original Tavistock Institute and an integral part of many of its contributions in the post-war era. This video webcast provides a rich introduction to her and to the tradition of thought and practice she represents. As such this is an excellent start for what will become our archive of video webcasts.
The video was produced by Amy Fraher. We are very grateful for her contribution. Amy Fraher holds the copyright for the video and viewers are not allowed to duplicate or distribute the video without Amy Fraher's consent.

Comments:
27 July 2008, 6:00 AM Michael Pavlovic wrote:
Great material! Thank you Amy for sharing this with us. It is so important to hear a 1st hand account of the history and to hear about the persons involved.
Elisabeth makes it quite clear how much she takes it for granted that Group Relation has to have its roots in psychoanalysis. As well for the deeper understanding as for the observational mode instead of acting or finding the fast solutions.
What struck me about Bion was the suggestion that he didn't leave the field of group work because he lost interest but because he wanted a different path also for his own development. One can see that this is true when one starts to look at Bions later ideas and how they can be used to deepen our understand of groups too.
Thanks again for the opportunity to watch this interesting piece of work.
MIchael.

6 August 2008, 11:12 AM Tim Dartington wrote:
This is an important record of Isabel as a person, her forthright approach and insights and the occasional dogmatic statement. The interview reminds me of the creative force in the small group of psychiatrists and psychologists who came together in wartime and then in post-war Britain. Was Isabel’s anti-Americanism in the interview a product also of those times? What are the conditions needed for such creativity to emerge at other times of threat and change. eg, now, in the context of globalization? Isabel had a capacity to work with the psychotic aspects of human relations in groups and organizations, which is not fashionable in consultancy but relevant, I suggest, to the challenges of living with uncertainty in the context of so much diversity. Thank you, Amy.

30 October 2008, 3:27 PM Richard Trahair wrote:
A most interesting interview and important record. Early information about the Tavistock group does not tally well with the Tavistock records or the information in the 3 volume Tavistock Anthology. Photos are intersting; identifying who is who is difficult. Bowlby, Trist, Sutherland are clear enough. Others not. Her reflectins on her own work are excellently drawn out. Thank you to the authors.

26 November 2008, 8:39 PM Anil Behal wrote:
Many thanks Amy for sharing your interview with Isabel Menzies Lyth! I read your book a few years ago, but this has really brought your work to life! It is an amazing archive. As someone who is always looking for ways to connect people and ideas, this has been a most refreshing encounter for me. On the eve of Thanksgiving, I cannot thank you enough for making this a possibility!

23 June 2009, 5:00 AM Roulette spielen wrote:
Elisabeth makes it quite clear how much she takes it for granted that Group Relation has to have its roots in psychoanalysis. As well for the deeper understanding as for the observational mode instead of acting or finding the fast solutions. Was Isabel’s anti-Americanism in the interview a product also of those times? What are the conditions needed for such creativity to emerge at other times of threat and change. eg, now, in the context of globalization? Isabel had a capacity to work with the psychotic aspects of human relations in groups and organizations, which is not fashionable in consultancy but relevant, I suggest, to the challenges of living with uncertainty in the context of so much diversity.

14 February 2012, 12:04 PM sportswear brands wrote:
Isabel Ménzies Lyth, the only woman in the pioneering group of social scientists who formed the Tavistock Institute of Human Relations in London after the second world war, has died, aged 90. A distinguished psychoanalyst, she was also noted for her ability to apply her insights to groups and organisations, especially nurses and other health professionals.

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Language: English


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Amy Fraher

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